Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month

Seven facts you did not know about juvenile arthritis

The boys are sick

By Tanasia Jackson

Arthritis, the nation’s number one cause of disability, has a common misconception that only “old” people suffer from arthritis. The disease, however, does not discriminate, affecting those of all ages, races and genders. July is observed as Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month because “Kids Get Arthritis, Too.”

To raise awareness for juvenile arthritis, here are seven facts you may not know about this life impacting disease.

  1. Juvenile arthritis (JA) itself is not the disease
    JA is a broad term used to cover the variety of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions or pediatric rheumatic diseases that can develop in children up to the age of 16.
  1. There are seven different types of juvenile arthritis
    Types of JA include juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile lupus, juvenile scleroderma, Kawasaki disease, mixed connective tissue disease and fibromyalgia. You can learn more about the different types of juvenile arthritis at arthritis.org.
  1. Juvenile arthritis affects nearly 300,000 children in the United States
    A 2007 Centers for Control and Disease Prevention study estimated that every 1 in 250 children have been diagnosed with arthritis or another rheumatologic condition. That’s nearly 300,000 children who are not able to enjoy their childhood to the fullest.
  1. There is no blood test to diagnose the disease
    According to the Arthritis Foundation, there is no single blood test that confirms any type of juvenile arthritis. The key to diagnosis is a detailed physical exam and a study of medical history.
  1. No known cause has been pinpointed
    As an autoimmune disorder, the immune system attacks the body’s healthy cells and tissues. The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) states that scientists don’t know why this happens or what causes the disorder. Many believe a child’s inherited genes may make a child more likely to get arthritis.
  1. While remission is possible, there is no known cure for arthritis
    Unfortunately, no known cure for arthritis exists. The ultimate goal of treatment is to improve the child’s quality of life.
  1. You have the chance to change lives
    The Arthritis Foundation states, “When you join the movement, you become part of the answer.” Become a part of the answer this summer by finding events near you. You can also volunteer at the 2015 National JA Conference, which is set to take place at the end of Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month.

You can promise to raise awareness for juvenile arthritis or to get involved by joining OrthoIndy’s I Promise campaign.

Tanasia Crop

Posted by, Tanasia Jackson, the OrthoIndy Marketing Intern during summer 2015. During her internship, Jackson wrote a wide array of articles and blog posts, as well as aided in social media and media relations tactics for OrthoIndy and OrthoIndy Hospital. Jackson will graduate from Ball State University in May 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in public relations and a communications studies minor.

OrthoIndy Opens Urgent Care Facilities throughout Greater Indianapolis Area

New Urgent Care Facilities Provide Residents Immediate Access to an Orthopedic Specialist While Avoiding Emergency Room Wait and Cost

By: Tanasia Jackson

On July 6, OrthoIndy will open Urgent Care facilities at its OrthoIndy Northwest, South, West and Fishers locations. Each facility will provide emergency access to bone, joint and muscle care by orthopedic physicians and physician assistants without having to schedule an appointment.

“OrthoIndy Urgent Care clinics provide immediate access to high quality specialty care for urgent bone, joint or muscle problems,” said Dr. John Dietz, OrthoIndy spine surgeon. ”Patients can be diagnosed and treated immediately, without long waits and close to home by OrthoIndy.”

The Urgent Care facilities will be open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Northwest location will be open Sunday from noon to 4 p.m

“OrthoIndy is seeking to benefit the community as a whole with our Urgent Care facilities,” said Jane Keller, CEO of OrthoIndy and OrthoIndy Hospital. “With multiple locations, the entire Indianapolis area has better access to our specialized care every day of the week. The extended hours were created to fit our community’s needs. When some physician’s offices are closed, OrthoIndy’s doors remain open to every citizen.”

You may be referred to an emergency room for the following injuries:

  • Open fractures
  • Major joint dislocations
  • Burns
  • If you arrive on a gurney

All patients are seen on a first come, first serve basis. If you have any questions, inquiries or would like more information prior to your visit, please call (317) 802-2000 or visit OrthoIndy.com.

Tanasia Crop

Posted by, Tanasia Jackson, the OrthoIndy Marketing Intern during summer 2015. During her internship, Jackson wrote a wide array of articles and blog posts, as well as aided in social media and media relations tactics for OrthoIndy and OrthoIndy Hospital. Jackson will graduate from Ball State University in May 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in public relations and a communications studies minor.

Seven Tips for Fourth of July Fireworks Fun

sparkler

By Tanasia Jackson

Last year, the American Pyrotechnics Association (APA) projected $675 million to be spent on consumer fireworks to celebrate Independence Day. The spike in sales is mainly due to the liberation of consumer fireworks laws, leading to an increase in backyard firework usage, according to Julie L. Heckman, Executive Director of APA.

To correlate with the fireworks liberation, the number of fireworks-related injuries and fires has decreased 43 percent since 2000. Injury statistics have declined, but safety is still top priority.

Here are seven safety tips on how to enjoy fireworks displays, but avoid the danger that could accompany them.

  1. Make sure the fireworks are legal
    You are encouraged to report the manufacturing or selling of any illegal fireworks, such as M-80’s and quarter sticks to your local police or fire department. You may also call the Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) hotline at 1-888-ATF-BOMB (1-888-293-2662).
  1. Know your fireworks
    If your fireworks came in a brown paper bag, they are most likely for professional use. Leave those to the professionals and purchase consumer fireworks instead.
  1. Avoid homemade fireworks
    Do not experiment with explosives or fireworks made unprofessionally.
  1. Alcohol and fireworks do not mix
    Alcohol causes impaired judgment and decreased perception and coordination. Fireworks should be used with caution, which requires an unaltered state of mind.
  1. Adult supervision is necessary at all times
    All fireworks have the potential to cause injury, therefore children should never be allowed to play with or ignite fireworks, including sparklers. If older children are able to handle fireworks, adult supervision should still be present.
  1. Do not point or throw fireworks at someone
    Pointing or throwing fireworks at someone has the potential to cause serious harm to the person and their surroundings.
  1. Never relight a “dud”
    You should allow 20 minutes before approaching a malfunctioning firework. After the allotted 20 minutes, soak them in water and throw them away.

When accidents occur, visit the OrthoIndy Trauma Center at St.Vincent Indianapolis for
fireworks-related injuries.

Comment below and tell us how you celebrate the Fourth of July or make a promise to be safe while handling fireworks at orthoindy.com/ipromise.

 

Tanasia Crop

Posted by, Tanasia Jackson, the OrthoIndy Marketing Intern during summer 2015. During her internship, Jackson wrote a wide array of articles and blog posts, as well as aided in social media and media relations tactics for OrthoIndy and OrthoIndy Hospital. Jackson will graduate from Ball State University in May 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in public relations and a communications studies minor

Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

Doctors Examining X-ray Report

Featuring OrthoIndy Spine Surgeon Dr. Gregory Poulter

What is minimally invasive spine surgery?
Minimally invasive spine surgery does not correspond to any one particular surgery but refers to a surgical philosophy and the techniques that have been developed with this philosophy in mind. The idea behind minimally invasive spine surgery is to perform a surgery with the least amount of disruption to surrounding tissues as possible, while providing a procedure that is just as safe and effective as one performed with a traditional approach.

Why make an incision any larger than what is needed to perform a procedure safely and effectively? Minimally invasive surgery was made possible by the advent of technologies that allow us to access the spine and hold tissues out of the way without damaging them. As these technologies have been refined over the years, minimally invasive spine surgery has become more common.

What types of spine surgery can be performed with a minimally invasive technique?
Minimally invasive techniques have been developed to replace most of the traditional spine surgeries. Microdiscectomies, laminectomies and fusions are commonly performed as minimally invasive surgeries. There are advanced techniques for scoliosis and fracture surgery as well. This is not a complete list. In general, spine surgery has advanced greatly in the last 10 years. Much of the improvement has come from minimizing the disruption of surgery.

Can all spine surgeries be performed with a minimally invasive technique?
The first priority should be that a patient has a safe and effective procedure. Every consideration should be made to minimize the impact of a surgery and reduce complications. Often this includes the use of a newer minimally invasive technique. While most common conditions can be effectively cared for with minimally invasive surgery, there are times when the nature of the problem warrants a more traditional larger incision.

Do all spine surgeons perform minimally invasive spine surgery?
Minimally invasive techniques are new to spine surgery and there are many surgeons who completed their training prior to the advent of these procedures. As a result, the field of spine surgery is in transition with some surgeons being very comfortable offering these techniques while others have yet to include them in their practice.

Is minimally invasive spine surgery better than traditional surgery?
As mentioned before, minimally invasive spine surgery is not one technique but a variety of techniques. However, in general it has been demonstrated that post-operative pain and time for recovery is reduced by minimally invasive techniques. For spinal fusions, minimally invasive surgery has shown to decrease the risk of infection and other complications while providing the same or better success rate for the fusion. For these reasons, minimally invasive techniques are considered an advancement in spine surgery.

How do I know if a surgeon is trained in minimally invasive surgery?
This is difficult. At this time there is no specific training or certification in minimally invasive spine surgery. You can research surgeons in your area that offer these techniques. If you visit with one, ask them about the techniques they offer and their comfort level performing them.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Poulter, please call (317) 802-2424 or request an appointment online at OrthoIndy.com/request.

Water sports and distal biceps tendon tears

Woman study riding on a wakeboard

By: Megan Skelly

For a lot of Indiana residents, summer time means spending time outdoors at the lake. Whether it’s cooking out, fishing or boating there is plenty to do to keep everyone busy. With all the fun, sometimes it’s hard to remember to stay safe.

Water sports, such as skiing or tubing, can cause serious injuries. One injury common to water sports is distal biceps tendon tears.

Distal bicep tendon tears typically result from an eccentric contraction of the biceps. An eccentric contraction means that while the muscle is contracting, it is lengthening; muscles normally shorten when they contract, also called a concentric contraction. An example of an eccentric contraction is lowering a weight down after doing a biceps curl. Tears occur when the eccentric contraction is unexpected or very violent.

“Water sports, such as skiing and tubing, can cause a violent eccentric contraction of the biceps as you attempt to hold onto the rope, as the boat pulls you out of the water,” said Dr. Chris Bales, OrthoIndy sports medicine specialist. “Weight lifting can also result in distal bicep tendon tears; such as bicep curls with too much weight or pull-ups.”

Dr. Bales explained that any lifting activity could result in a biceps tendon tear, such as helping someone move a couch or TV and one person lets go. The other person lifting the object tries to hold on and his or her arm is forcefully brought down (an eccentric contraction) tearing the biceps tendon.

At the time of injury, someone with a distal biceps tendon tear would feel a pop in their elbow, associated with sharp pain. Most will develop swelling and bruising over the front and inside part of the elbow. Most will have some limitations in their range of motion due to swelling and pain.

Dr. Bales added that in most active and younger patients the biceps tendon tear is treated with surgery to re-attach it the bone. This allows for almost full return of strength. After surgery most individuals are back to regular activities by three to four months, but full return of strength can take six months or longer.

“In less active individuals, non-operative treatment can be considered,” said Dr. Bales. “This consists of ice, elevation and use of a sling as needed for comfort. Patients will modify activities until pain symptoms decrease and then begin working on range of motion and regaining strength. Studies have shown anywhere from 25 to 50 percent loss of flexion and supination strength with non-operative treatment, as well as a similar loss in endurance strength.”

Proper warm-up and stretching before sporting activities and proper lifting technique can help decrease the chance of a distal biceps tendon tear.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Bales please call (317) 268-3632 or request an appointment online.

OrthoIndy Partners with Greater Indy Habitat to Provide a Veteran a Home

image

By: Tanasia Jackson

In its second year partnering with Greater Indy Habitat for Humanity, OrthoIndy will provide a home this summer for a veteran in need of affordable, quality housing. In addition to donating the funds to build the house, OrthoIndy executives, physicians and employees will construct the home in the Barrington neighborhood north of Beech Grove alongside future homeowner, Vito Sanders, and local veteran-serving groups.

“The physicians, nurses and employees of OrthoIndy are excited to partner with Greater Indy Habitat for Humanity for the second year in a row,” said John Dietz, OrthoIndy spine surgeon. “All of our lives have been touched by the sacrifices our nation’s service men and women have made. It is an honor for us to have this opportunity to express our gratitude and build a home for a veteran. We all sincerely hope that this home will welcome and shelter its veteran for many years to come.”

Sanders is excited to build his first home with OrthoIndy volunteers. “I think this is a wonderful opportunity not only for the chance to become a first-time homeowner but also to gain the awesome experience in volunteering to help others realize this dream as well,” said Sanders. “I look forward to being able to help wherever I can during this process in order to make sure other people, more deserving people, are given such a wonderful chance to grow in life.”

Each Habitat homeowner completes 300 sweat-equity hours, which includes homeownership and financial education classes and volunteer hours on their home, before they purchase their home with a no-interest mortgage.

“Through the partnership with OrthoIndy, our affiliate is now better connected to veterans and veteran-serving organizations in our community, enabling Habitat to increase service to this population,” said Jim Morris, Greater Indy Habitat for Humanity President and Chief Executive Officer. “The generosity of OrthoIndy has extended the impact of this Veteran Build project and given us the opportunity to better understand the shelter needs of veterans in our community.”

Construction on the Veteran Build will began June 4th and continues through August 11th. The home dedication is tentatively scheduled for Friday, August 14th.

Tanasia Crop

Posted by, Tanasia Jackson, the OrthoIndy Marketing Intern during summer 2015. During her internship, Jackson wrote a wide array of articles and blog posts, as well as aided in social media and media relations tactics for OrthoIndy and OrthoIndy Hospital. Jackson will graduate from Ball State University in May 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in public relations and a communications studies minor.

National Safety Month: What do you live for?

Safety First road sign against blue sky

By: Tanasia Jackson

Safety is the highest priority for the National Safety Council (NSC). Every June, NSC focuses on ways to reduce the lead causes of injury and death, whether it is in the workplace, on the road or at home.

National Safety Month 2015 is dedicated to passions and life experiences. The NSC is asking you to ask yourself, “What do I live for?” The list could be endless, but no matter what your answer may be, we can all work together to live safely by focusing on these five important topics.

  1. Prescription painkiller abuse
    Narcotic pain medications are often effective for post-op pain. The worry of addiction is common among patients; however addiction is unlikely to develop after the short use of narcotics. There are other factors that can contribute to the abuse of prescription painkillers, including family history, childhood trauma and mental illness.The physicians at OrthoIndy work with patients to give the best solutions to lead to better outcomes. When given a pain medication prescription, it is crucial to use these medications as directed.
  1. Transportation safety
    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, each day, more than nine people are killed and 1,060 more are injured in crashes that involved a distracted driver. Today, nine people will not be able to ask themselves, “What do I live for?” Driving safely and undistracted is important and can save lives.OrthoIndy created a campaign called I Promise to encourage people in our community to make a promise to be safer. Visit our campaign site to make your promise to be a safer driver. When accidents happen, promise to choose OrthoIndy.
  1. Ergonomics
    Ergonomics is the study of an individual’s efficiency in their working environment. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the most frequently reported causes of the loss of work time, affecting the efficiency of employees.Poor ergonomics can lead to cubital tunnel syndrome, elbow injuries, tendinitis and other musculoskeletal disorders, all of which can be treated at OrthoIndy.
  1. Emergency preparedness
    Being prepared for an emergency and having a plan is important at home, school and the workplace. Natural disasters are common to certain areas so start your plan knowing which of those generally occur in your location. Create an emergency kit with daily necessities and place in an area accessible to everyone.For more emergency preparedness tips, visit the CDC’s Emergency Preparedness and Response page.
  1. Slips, trips and falls
    This topic is most likely the easiest to prevent, yet the most common. With summer just around the corner, outside projects and spring cleaning are normal, harmless activities. Locations known for fall injuries include doorways, cluttered areas and ladders – all of which are normally seen during outside projects and spring cleaning.Remember to clean cluttered areas, especially in doorways and narrow hallways, and follow these ladder safety tips from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

This June, join the NSC and OrthoIndy in making safety your highest priority. Promise to live a safer life for yourself and others by joining the I Promise campaign.

Tanasia Crop

Posted by, Tanasia Jackson, the OrthoIndy Marketing Intern during summer 2015. During her internship, Jackson wrote a wide array of articles and blog posts, as well as aided in social media and media relations tactics for OrthoIndy and OrthoIndy Hospital. Jackson will graduate from Ball State University in May 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in public relations and a communications studies minor.